'Kiss of death' cancer
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IMAGE: This is L-R: Dr Sungyoung Shim and Dr Lan Nguyen. view more 

Credit: Monash University

It’s called the ‘kiss of death’. Triple negative breast cancer has no targeted drug therapy and, as such, the only hope for these patients is chemotherapy. Triple negative breast cancer is aggressive and deadly. Patients are currently treated by chemotherapy but there is no guarantee of success – and unfortunately, for those that chemotherapy does not work, the survival rate remains only 12 months.

Doctors are turning to combination therapies – cocktails of drugs – in an effort to kill the cancer. However there is no reliable way to predict which combinations, amongst hundreds, will work (and work quickly) for an individual patient with triple negative breast cancer.

Monash researchers have used genetic and treatment data from triple negative cancer cells grown in the lab and from hundreds of patients world-wide to develop a computer program, which has revealed a previously unknown combination of drugs that may be the answer to the disease. Published today in the prestigious journal, PLOS Computational Biology, Dr Lan Nguyen from the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, and his team, believes the computer model will eventually become an app

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Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

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