'Liquid biopsy' can help predict outcomes in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer
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COLUMBUS, OHIO – A clinically relevant “liquid biopsy” test can be used to profile cancer genomes from blood and predict survival outcomes for patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), according to new research published by a multi-institutional team of researchers with The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James), the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

Although TNBC represents just 10-15 percent of all breast cancer diagnoses, the disease is responsible for 35 percent of all breast cancer-related deaths. While significant advances in understanding the genomic drivers of primary TNBC have been made in the past decade, relatively little is known about metastatic disease because surgical tumor biopsies are rarely obtained from these patients.

For this new study, researchers completed what is believed to be the largest genomic characterization of metastatic TNBC derived exclusively from liquid biopsies. This was done by measuring cell-free DNA levels in the blood — DNA that is excreted from both cancerous and normal cells into the bloodstream. The study included blood samples from 164 women with metastatic TNBC.

“Traditionally, we would need to obtain a tissue biopsy

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