80% cut in liver metastasis by restricting the blood vessels supplying it
Share

IMAGE: The researchers from left to right: Joana Márquez, Fernando Unda, Iker Badiola abd Gaskon Ibarretxe. view more 

Credit: (UPV/EHU)

Metastasis is the process whereby a tumour that grows in one organ breaks away from it and travels to another organ and colonises it. In the colonisation process it needs to create new blood vessels through which the cancer cells obtain the nutrients and oxygen they need to grow. This blood vessel formation process is called angiogenesis and is carried out by the endothelial cells. “Unlike normal endothelial cells and due to the signals that reach them from the tumour cells, the cells that supply the tumours have increased growth and tend to move towards the metastatic mass to help it grow,” said Iker Badiola, member of the Signaling Lab research group in the Department of Cell Biology and Histology of the UPV/EHU’s Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy.

In order to find out what is actually causing this change in the endothelial cells, the UPV/EHU’s Signaling Lab Research Group and the Department of Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology of the University of Santiago de Compostela, in collaboration with other groups of researchers, embarked on research using mice. The ultimate

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD