AFib patients with cancer history less likely to see cardiologist, fill prescriptions
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Atrial fibrillation (AFib) patients with a history of cancer are less likely to see a cardiologist or fill anticoagulant prescriptions compared with AFib patients who never had cancer, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. By not filling and taking prescribed medication, these patients are potentially putting themselves at increased risk of stroke.

Cancer detection and treatment methods have improved significantly over time, leading to a greater number of older people who are surviving and living longer after a cancer diagnosis, and as a result, developing other health conditions. AFib specifically is an important comorbid condition in cancer patients. Both have several common predisposing factors, including advanced age and inflammation, plus certain chemotherapeutic agents have been linked to the development of AFib.

How to best care for the increasing number of cancer survivors who are reaching older ages is a challenge for clinicians since comorbid conditions usually span multiple specialties. This study looked at the relationship between early cardiology involvement after an AFib diagnosis in patients with a history of cancer and how that affected outcomes.

“Overall, our data suggest that suboptimal antithrombotic care exists in AFib patients who have a history of

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