IMAGE: Esma Yolcu, Ph.D. view more  view more  Credit: University of Louisville LOUISVILLE, Ky. – A research team at the University of Louisville has discovered that an immune checkpoint molecule they developed for cancer immunotherapy, also protects against future development of multiple types of cancer when administered by itself. The recombinant protein molecule SA-4-1BBL has been…

IMAGE: This photo shows from left to right Dr. Shalin Naik, Professor Jane Visvader, Dr. Tom Weber and Dr. Delphine Merino. view more  Credit: Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research A cutting-edge technique called cellular barcoding has been used to tag, track and pinpoint cells responsible for the spread of breast cancer from the…

The artificial intelligence software, created by researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Melbourne, has been able to predict the prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer more accurately than current methods. It can also predict what treatment would be most effective for patients following diagnosis. The trial, published in Nature Communications took place…

VIDEO: This movie depicts the conformational changes that accompany SUMO E1 binding to COH000. Selected structural elements are labeled and regions of the enzyme that become disordered in the SUMO… view more  view more  Credit: Medical University of South Carolina, courtesy of Dr. Shaun Olsen A research team at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC)…

Results from the NRG Oncology clinical study NRG-RTOG 0415 determined that a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule (H-RT), a treatment schedule that delivers a total dose of radiotherapy over a shorter period of time, is not worse than the conventional radiotherapy schedule (C-RT) in terms of bowel, bladder, sexual, and general quality of life (QOL) as well…

IMAGE: MyPal aims to investigate the use of apps and electronic games created and adapted specifically to the personal needs of patients. view more  Credit: Lancaster University Lancaster University is sharing in a €4m project to use gaming technology to improve the care of both adults and children with cancer. The project – called “MyPal: Fostering…

NEW YORK, NY (February 15, 2019)– Columbia researchers have learned why some glioblastomas–the most common type of brain cancer–respond to immunotherapy. The findings could help identify patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment with immunotherapy drugs and lead to the development of more broadly effective treatments. The study, led by Raul Rabadan, PhD,…

IMAGE: The MyPath app adapts to each stage in a patient’s cancer journey. view more  view more  Artificial Intelligence is helping to guide and support some 50 breast cancer patients in rural Georgia through a novel mobile application that gives them personalized recommendations on everything from side effects to insurance. The app, called MyPath, adapts to…

IMAGE: The study of natural toxins and their derivatives may help in the development of medicines to treat diseases like cancer and osteoarthritis, says Ana Marisa Chudzinski-Tavassi, coordinator of the Center… view more  view more  Credit: Heitor Shimizu Animal venoms are the subject of study at research center based at the Butantan Institute in São Paulo….

Like going from a pinhole camera to a Polaroid, a significant mathematical update to the formula for a popular bioinformatics data visualization method will allow researchers to develop snapshots of single-cell gene expression not only several times faster but also at much higher-resolution. Published in Nature Methods, this innovation by Yale mathematicians will reduce the…

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