Blood test could detect kidney cancer up to 5 years earlier
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Scientists have discovered that a marker in the blood could help predict the risk that a person will develop kidney cancer, according to research* published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.

Supported by Cancer Research UK, the IARC and the NIH, the work used samples taken as part of the EPIC** study to examine the blood of 190 people who went on to develop kidney cancer, compared to 190 controls who did not.

They found that measuring levels of a protein molecule in the blood, called KIM-1, could indicate whether a person was more likely to develop kidney cancer over the following 5 years.

The data also showed that the greater the concentration of KIM-1, the higher their risk*** of developing kidney cancer.

In people with kidney cancer, KIM-1 levels were also found to be linked with poor survival, as those with the highest levels in their blood were less likely to survive.

In the future, the scientists think that testing for blood KIM-1 levels could be used alongside imaging to confirm suspicions of kidney cancer, or help to rule out the disease.

Dr David Muller, Cancer Research UK-funded co-first author based at Imperial College London, said: “This work

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