Cancer 'signature' first step toward blood test for patients
Share

VIDEO: Lung cancer researchers Dr Sarah Best and Dr Kate Sutherland from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Melbourne, describe their new research, which has revealed a unique molecular signature in… view more 

view more 

A discovery by Melbourne researchers could help to identify patients with a particularly aggressive type of lung cancer that are likely to respond to immunotherapies currently used in the clinic to treat other cancers.

The research has also revealed a unique molecular signature in the blood that could, in the future, be used to detect these aggressive lung cancers with a simple blood test.

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute cancer researchers Dr Sarah Best and Dr Kate Sutherland led the research, working with colleagues at Metabolomics Australia at the Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne. The study was published today in Cell Metabolism.

The study focused on the role of two cell signalling pathways – KEAP1/NRF2 and PI3K – which are known to be involved in human lung cancers called adenocarcinomas.

“More than one in five lung adenocarcinomas have alterations in the KEAP1/NRF2 pathway, suggesting it is a major cancer driver,” Dr Sutherland said. “These cancers are very aggressive, are resistant to standard therapies and have a poor

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD