What good is a longer life if you have to spend half of it keeping up with the news? Ditch those endlessly scrolling feeds, and instead join us every other week for a concentrated dose of the most exciting developments in the field of geroscience. Here’s the recap: Naked mole rats really do age better,…

“Aging” isn’t a disease as recognized by the FDA–not yet anyway. But then how will the companies trialing anti-aging drugs ever get regulatory approval? It’s simple: just choose a “primary indication” to test your drug with. Of course, that choice itself is rather difficult when you’re considering a geroprotector. Here’s how investors think about it…

Part III of III in a series on the evolution of aging. (Part I, Part II) Part IPart II If all you had to go on was our genomes, you’d surely conclude that humans and rodents were nearly the same animal, with roughly 92% overlap. And luckily for the species that does science, the other…

Part of a series on the Hallmarks of Aging. Proteins don’t do everything in your body, but it’s fair to say they control everything. What they don’t do directly, they catalyze. Proteins handle everything from copying DNA, to stabilizing a neuron’s physical structure, to turning starch into sugar. If something goes wrong in the body,

Since the world of Alzheimer’s therapeutics hasn’t seen much practical benefit from targeting harmful proteins like amyloid-beta, maybe other approaches like targeting dysfunctional mitochondria are worth exploring in more depth. Apparently, improving mitochondrial function can decrease plaque burden and improve cognition in a mouse model. Why do cancer survivors have shorter lifespans than the rest

Long before the usual physiological signs, the withering of neurons and the gradual atrophy of the brain, that tip doctors off to the presence of a neurodegenerative disease, there’s already something different about their patients’ brain cells. Action potentials flash across a long, thin arm protruding from the cell body in a healthy neuron, and…

The Hippo pathway controls cellular regeneration, so why not modify it to heal the heart after the scarring caused by a heart attack? Six weeks later, mouse hearts were good as new. modify it Cytomegalovirus (a herpes virus) infects over 90% of humans, often silently, but this mostly harmless little viral companion takes up far…

The normal mode of drug discovery is a pretty singular affair: one compound, one disease. This is enough for many traditional diseases, but when you’re facing a complex phenomenon built on innumerable pathways like aging, where existing treatments only scratch the surface, you need to get a little more creative. complex phenomenon built on innumerable…

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