The researchers bound the kind of siRNA found in Huntington’s disease with a complementary strand from another degenerative disorder, myotonic dystrophy, to create a hybrid duplex, then put this inside nanoparticles that were quickly gobbled up by cancer cells in culture. All varieties of cancer tested–ovarian, lung, liver, melanoma, and several more–stopped growing within a…

Many years from now, you’re reclining in one of the many gray-blue armchairs that line the walls of a clinic. Your arm is propped up on a collapsible plastic armrest, and two thin tubes lead from your wrist to the slender white machine next to you, one tube delivering your blood to the machine’s mysterious…

We know you want to keep up with the relentless march of progress, but sometimes it’s just too relentless. So why not forget all those endlessly scrolling feeds, and instead join us for a bi-weekly concentrated dose of all the most exciting developments in the field of geroscience? Here’s what’s happened in the last two weeks:…

Biomarkers are a big deal in the clinical world: if as a doctor you’re able to take one simple measurement that allows you to look into a patient’s future, you’ve potentially elevated your practice of medicine from imprecise art to exact science. The better the biomarkers in your arsenal, the more information you have to…

Imagine a physiological love triangle: in one corner, a force with the weight of millions of years of evolutionary programming trained on preventing runaway replication; in the other, the set of epigenetic regulators that must maintain the ability of stem cells to churn out whatever kind of cell they need to. At first glance, the…

It’s looking increasingly likely that our little bacterial buddies have a major influence on neurodegenerative disease, from producing extra amyloid, to regulating inflammation, to generating free radicals. In mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease, a protein complex that forms part of the nervous system’s innate immune system binds to toxic amyloid-beta, promoting the formation of plaques.

One contributor to the aging of your immune system is that your thymus–the gland that turns leukocytes into T cells–is slowly replaced by fat, and eventually shuts down around puberty. In a perfect world this wouldn’t be a problem, because our existing T cells would be appropriately proportioned to cover the entire infection space. In

Last Wednesday I attended the Buck Institute’s workshop on AI and Longevity, where speakers from several different organizations discussed how they were using machine learning to advance different aspects of medical discovery. Uses for AI in aging include creating new drugs, finding new uses for existing drugs, and discovering new biomarkers–all of which are important…

At its most dramatic, oxidative stress can rend DNA in two and predispose cells to mutations that ultimately result in cancer. But the less bombastic effects of reactive oxygen molecules are no less damaging, as they likely play a central role in the world’s number one killer, vascular disease, causing stroke and heart attack among

In biomedical science, rodents are the old stalwarts: they’re cheap, easy to care for, have lives short enough to allow us to observe them over the course of a couple of years, and it’s fairly easy to produce a population of mice with whatever sort of genetic mutation we could want. But while they’re at…

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