Share

19

Jun

2018

19

Jun

2018

Cellular Senescence in Aging versus Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Loading…

Loading…

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is caused by long-term inhalation of smoke or other particulate or chemical irritants. In wealthier parts of the world, that usually means smoking. In less wealthy parts of the world, cooking fires and industrial processes also contribute. The condition shares some mechanisms with aging, particularly the accumulation of senescent cells and the chronic inflammation produced by those cells. In some ways, it is possible to consider aspects of COPD to be accelerated lung aging. In other ways it is entirely different. This is generally true of the environmental contributions that make up secondary aging, the various exposures that cause harm and dysfunction by speeding up specific, narrow forms of cell and tissue damage. The open access paper here is interesting for the comparisons it draws between aging and smoking as causes of increased cellular senescence in the lungs.

Most parts of the body including the lungs experience progressive damage with aging as well as impaired function. Lung aging is associated with loss of elasticity, a decrease in pulmonary function, loss of structural integrity, and an increase in inflammation

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.fightaging.org

Click here for the full story


© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD