Cleveland Clinic researchers receive $4.7 million NIH grant to prevent cancer-associated thrombosis
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IMAGE: This is Keith McCrae, M.D., Cleveland Clinic. view more 

Credit: Cleveland Clinic

Aug. 8, 2018, Cleveland: The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, awarded a $4.7 million grant to Cleveland Clinic to study the prevention of life-threatening, cancer-associated blood clots.

The new funding will support a Cleveland Clinic-led research consortium, which will focus on developing strategies to prevent cancer-associated thrombosis (blood clot formation), a potential side effect of cancer treatment.

The five-year grant, led by Keith McCrae, M.D., and Alok Khorana, M.D., supports the creation of a new risk assessment tool to better predict which cancer patients will develop blood clots during treatment. The project, led by Cleveland Clinic’s Taussig Cancer Institute and Lerner Research Institute, will coordinate a consortium of three sites involved in this NHLBI program. Other sites include Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Harvard Medical School) and the University of Cincinnati.

“About 20 percent of cancer patients develop blood clots, which can cause stroke, hospitalization and delays in treatment. In fact, cancer-associated thrombosis is the second leading cause of death in patients with cancer,” said Dr. Khorana, director of the gastrointestinal malignancies program at the Taussig Cancer

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