Colorectal cancer: Combined analysis enhances risk prediction
Share

If first-degree relatives are affected by colorectal cancer, this indicates a person’s own elevated risk of developing bowel cancer. The same holds true for people who have large numbers of genetic risk markers in their genome. Both factors are usually used alternatively, not combined, to predict risk. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg have now shown that a combination of family history and an analysis of genetic markers helps determine a person’s colorectal cancer risk more precisely.

When the conversation is about colon cancer screening, physicians often ask their patients about cancer cases among close family members. Colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives is considered a known risk factor for the disease. Besides family history, a person’s profile of genetic risk markers also provides information about his or her personal cancer risk. This scientific term refers to very small gene variants (called single nucleotide polymorphisms), each of which, taken on its own, has only minimal relation to the probability of suffering disease. Taken together, however, they have a significant impact.

“It is a widely held notion that genetic risk profile and family history essentially both provide the same, redundant information,” says Hermann Brenner, an expert for

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD