Device may detect heart dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors treated with chemo
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Bottom Line: A wireless device designed for detection of heart dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors treated with anthracycline chemotherapy was accurate and displayed a low false-negative rate as compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging.

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Author: Saro Armenian, DO, MPH, director of the Childhood Cancer Survivorship Clinic, City of Hope, Duarte, California

Background: “The pediatric oncology community is becoming increasingly aware that there are new issues faced by many cancer survivors that may not manifest themselves until decades after their cancer treatment is done,” said Armenian. “One of these issues is a higher burden of cardiovascular disease, which can result from exposure to anthracyclines [a class of chemotherapy] as part of their cancer treatment.”

Because of known anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity, it is recommended that childhood cancer survivors undergo screening for the detection of heart dysfunction following the completion of their treatment. Screening via echocardiography is the standard of care for monitoring heart function, yet this technique can be highly variable and has many limitations, noted Armenian. CMR imaging is an alternative screening method and is regarded as the gold standard; however,

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