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IMAGE: The researchers from left to right, Kiera Walker, Nathaniel Boyd and Anita Hjelmeland. view more 

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Credit: UAB

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – In animal experiments, a human-derived glioblastoma significantly regressed when treated with the combination of an experimental enzyme inhibitor and the standard glioblastoma chemotherapy drug, temozolomide.

The regression seen in this combination therapy of temozolomide and the inhibitor SLC-0111 — which targets the enzyme carbonic anhydrase 9, or CA9 — was greater than that seen with either SLC-0111 or temozolomide alone, says research leader Anita Hjelmeland, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

“Our experiments strongly suggest that a strategy to target a carbonic anhydrase that is increased in glioblastoma, CA9, will improve temozolomide efficacy,” Hjelmeland said. “We believe the drug combination could improve patient outcomes in glioblastomas sensitive to chemotherapy.”

Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor seen in adults. Half of the tumors recur less than seven months after undergoing the standard treatment of surgery, temozolomide and radiation. The median survival after diagnosis of this deadly cancer is 12 to 14 months. Thus, new approaches to therapy are urgently needed.

Solid tumors like glioblastoma create microenvironments within and around themselves. A

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