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26

Apr

2018

26

Apr

2018

Exercise Increases the Rate at Which New Heart Cells are Produced

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To follow on from yesterday’s set of exercise related research, here is an interesting note on what exercise does to the basis for heart tissue maintenance. The heart is one of the least regenerative organs in mammals, not capable of repairing itself to any significant degree following injury. Nonetheless, within those limited bounds, exercise makes a sizable difference. This is supported by the evidence showing that heart disease patients have a better prognosis when they maintain a program of exercise, even to the lesser degree that they are capable of sustaining.

In a new study performed in mice, researchers uncovered one explanation for why exercise might be beneficial: It stimulates the heart to make new muscle cells, both under normal conditions and after a heart attack. The human heart has a relatively low capacity to regenerate itself. Young adults can renew around 1 percent of their heart muscle cells every year, and that rate decreases with age. Losing those cells is linked to heart failure, so interventions that increase cell formation have the potential to help prevent it.

“We wanted to

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Article originally posted at
www.fightaging.org

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