First-in-human clinical trial of new targeted therapy drug reports promising responses for multiple
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IMAGE: Vivek Subbiah, M.D. view more 

Credit: MD Anderson Cancer Center

A phase I, first-in-human study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reveals for the first time, an investigational drug that is effective and safe for patients with cancers caused by an alteration in the receptor tyrosine kinase known as RET. The drug appears to be promising as a potential therapy for RET-driven cancers, such as medullary and papillary thyroid, non-small cell lung, colorectal and bile duct cancers, which have been historically difficult to treat.

The oral drug, BLU-667, is being investigated in a multi-center, open label trial. The pre-clinical and early clinical validation are published in April 15 online issue of Cancer Discovery. The results from the trial were presented April 15 at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2018 in Chicago.

“There is a critical un-met need for effective drugs against cancers that have the RET alteration, as there are no highly potent inhibitors currently approved specifically for these RET-driven cancers,” said Vivek Subbiah, M.D., Assistant professor of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics. “The current treatments for these cancers are limited to traditional chemotherapy and earlier generations of multiple kinase inhibitors. These options

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