For survivors of childhood cancer  the advice is to walk
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Exercise could improve the life expectancy of adults who survive cancer as children, even if the activity begins years after treatments end, according to an inspiring new study.

But the study also finds that many survivors rarely, if ever, move much.

In one of the most stirring success stories of modern medicine, many childhood cancers are now treatable, including types that once would have been fatal.

But there can be costs associated with these advances. Some of the standard treatments for cancer, such as chemotherapy and radiation, are known to weaken the heart or increase the risks for subsequent tumors, including in children.

As a consequence, young people who survive cancer tend to die, on average, about 10 years earlier than unaffected adults of the same age, epidemiological studies show. In some cases they die from recurrences of their original malignancies, but more often from early heart disease or new cancers.

Exercise could improve the life expectancy of adults who survive cancer as children, even if the activity begins years after treatments end, according to an inspiring new study.

But the study also finds that many survivors rarely, if ever, move much.

In one of the most stirring success stories of modern medicine,

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Article originally posted at
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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