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The proportion of breast cancer patients who are eligible for breast conservation therapy, yet opt for mastectomy, is increasing, for reasons that include the desire to eliminate future screening and/or biopsy of the remaining breast tissue. A new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has determined that having a mastectomy does not completely eliminate the need for further breast imaging studies.

These results, published online in September in the Annals of Surgical Oncology, can help guide breast cancer patients and their physicians in their medical and surgical decision-making.

The study, titled “Defining the Need for Imaging and Biopsy After Mastectomy,” is a retrospective review of all mastectomy cases, either one-sided or both sides, performed at The Mount Sinai Hospital’s Dubin Breast Center. Post-mastectomy imaging and biopsy rates were determined. To the researchers’ knowledge, this is the first study to describe the incidence and need for postoperative imaging and biopsy for patients who undergo mastectomy.

“Autonomy and choice in treatment are encouraged, and can be empowering for patients. But decision-making can also result in anxiety, fear, and distress. Some patients might choose more extensive surgery with the hope that this will reduce the

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