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Bottom Line: Despite the steady increase of liver cancer incidence in the United States in recent decades, data from 2015 indicates that less than 13 percent of individuals born between 1945 and 1965 are estimated to have undergone screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV).

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Authors: Susan Vadaparampil, PhD, MPH, senior author, senior member and professor, Health Outcomes and Behavior Program, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida; Monica Kasting, PhD, lead author, postdoctoral fellow, Division of Population Science, Moffitt Cancer Center; Anna Giuliano, PhD, founding director of the Center for Infection Research in Cancer, Moffitt Cancer Center.

Background: “In the United States, approximately one in 30 baby boomers are chronically infected with HCV,” said Vadaparampil. “Almost half of all cases of liver cancer in the United States are caused by HCV. Therefore, it is important to identify and treat people who have the virus in order to prevent cancer.”

“Hepatitis C is an interesting virus because people who develop a chronic infection remain asymptomatic for decades and don’t know they’re infected,” explained Kasting. “Most of the baby boomers who screen

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