Immunotherapy associated with improved survival for patients with melanoma brain metastases
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First-line Treatment With Checkpoint Inhibitors Associated With Improved Overall Survival For Patients With Melanoma Brain Metastases

Bottom Line: Among patients with cutaneous melanoma who had brain metastases (MBM), first-line treatment with a checkpoint inhibitor was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in median overall survival, according to results from a national cohort.

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Immunology Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Authors: First author J. Bryan Iorgulescu, MD, postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Pathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School and Department of Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; senior author Timothy Smith, MD, PhD, MPH, director of the Computational Neuroscience Outcomes Center at the Department of Neurosurgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School; and mentor to Iorgulescu David A. Reardon, MD, clinical director of the Center for Neuro-Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School

Background: “Checkpoint blockade immunotherapies have revolutionized how we care for patients with advanced melanoma, leading to long-lasting treatment responses in many patients,” said Iorgulescu. “However, many of the early clinical trials of checkpoint blockade immunotherapies included few melanoma patients with brain metastases – despite

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