Improved method of delivering anti-cancer drugs
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A new non-toxic method for delivering anti-cancer drugs to specific parts of the human body could mean the end of the severe and nasty side effects associated with many cancer therapies, according to researchers at Cardiff University’s School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

The method involves the use of a new type of a nanotube – a tiny tube used in many applications, including drug delivery.

This new type, designed and created by Dr Ben Newland at Cardiff University, is made from a non-toxic polymer called poly(ethylene glycol). Unlike current nanotubes, which can cause asbestos like toxicity, these new versions are soft, flexible and biocompatible, meaning they should be well tolerated by the body.

It’s thought that not only could the development of this new nanotube provide a better way of delivering anti-cancer drugs, it could lead to far less side effects too.

That’s because, currently, many drugs used in chemotherapy to treat various forms of cancer are administered through an injection into the blood stream. Although these drugs reach cancer cells, they also negatively impact on perfectly healthy cells causing an array of harsh side-effects including hair loss, sickness and extreme fatigue.

The new nanotube has the potential

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