In laboratory, SLU scientist turns off chemo pain
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IMAGE: This is Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology and physiology at SLU. view more 

Credit: Saint Louis University

ST. LOUIS — In a recent paper published in the journal Pain, Saint Louis University researchers describe their success in an animal model in turning off the excruciating pain that often accompanies a colorectal cancer drug.

Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology and physiology at SLU, studies pain pathways, the series of interactions between molecular-level components that lead to pain in the body.

One type of pain she examines is chemotherapy induced neuropathic pain (CINP), a debilitating side effect of chemotherapy that can appear as tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, shooting or burning pain in the limbs, or can feel like hot or cold temperature extremes. In addition to causing patients suffering, CINP is often a limiting factor when it comes to treatment.

“Thanks to the increased efficacy of cancer treatment, there are nearly 14 million cancer survivors in the United States,” Salvemini said. “Many of these survivors suffer from long-term side effects of CINP, for which there are no proven strategies for prevention or treatment.

“This is a huge unmet medical need.”

In her current paper,

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