Interaction between immune factors triggers cancer-promoting chronic inflammation
Share

IMAGE: Mass. General Hospital investigators have identified immune factors that interact to initiate cancer-promoting chronic inflammation — as in this image of cancer-prone colitis in a mouse colon. view more 

Credit: Amir Ameri, MGH Center for Cancer Immunology/Cutaneous Biology Research Center

A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified interaction between two elements of the immune system as critical for the transformation of a protective immune response into chronic, cancer-promoting inflammation. In their report published in PNAS, the investigators demonstrate that elevated levels of the immune factor IL-33 and regulatory T cells (Tregs), which suppress the action of tumor-fighting immune cells, set the stage for the development of skin cancer associated with chronic dermatitis and colorectal cancer in patients with colitis.

“Our research has revealed a critical immunological axis that initiates the development of cancer-promoting chronic inflammation,” says Shawn Demehri, MD, PhD, of the MGH Center for Cancer Immunology and the Cutaneous Biology Research Center, senior author of the report. “This axis is chronic inflammation’s ‘Achilles heel,’ and blocking it promises to prevent cancer development in chronic inflammation, which accounts for almost 20 percent of all human cancer deaths worldwide.”

Types of cancer associated with chronic inflammation include

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD