Kaiser Permanente Northern California's colorectal cancer screening program saves lives
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Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California are 52 percent less likely to die from colorectal cancer since the health care system launched a comprehensive, organized screening program, according to a new study in the specialty’s top journal, Gastroenterology.

“Since we launched our screening program we have seen a remarkable decline in the number of cases of colorectal cancer and related deaths across a large, diverse population,” said gastroenterologist and co-lead author Theodore R. Levin, MD, clinical lead for Kaiser Permanente’s colorectal cancer screening in Northern California.

The study, “Effects of Organized Colorectal Cancer Screening on Cancer Incidence and Mortality in a Large, Community-based Population,” confirms that since Kaiser Permanente Norther California’s screening program for colorectal cancer was rolled out between 2006 and 2008, screening completion as recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force increased to 83 percent among those eligible (adults 50 to 75 years old) by 2015, compared to 66 percent nationally. In that same timeframe, new cases of colorectal cancer in the United States dropped 26 percent.

Researchers compared the periods before and after the organized Kaiser Permanente screening program was rolled out between 2006 and 2008. The study found that mortality from colorectal cancer decreased 52.4 percent from approximately

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