Low-dose aspirin may lower ovarian cancer risk
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Boston, MA – Women who reported recent, regular use of low-dose aspirin (100 milligrams or less) had a 23% lower risk of developing ovarian cancer when compared with women who did not regularly take aspirin, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study also found that long-term heavy use of non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

“What really differentiated this study from prior work was that we were able to analyze low-dose aspirin separately from standard dose aspirin,” said Mollie Barnard, a postdoctoral fellow at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, who led this research while a doctoral student at the Harvard Chan School. “Our findings emphasize that research on aspirin use and cancer risk must consider aspirin dose. Our results also highlight the need for ongoing conversations between patients and their doctors on the risks and benefits of taking low-dose aspirin.”

The study will be published online October 4, 2018 in JAMA Oncology.

Among U.S. women, ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer-related death. A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation plays a role in the

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