Lung cancer screening guidelines inadequate for high-risk minorities
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IMAGE: This is Lawrence Feldman. view more 

Credit: UIC

Data from a lung cancer screening program at the University of Illinois at Chicago provides evidence that national lung cancer screening guidelines, which were developed based on the National Lung Screening Trial, or NLST, in 2011 and recommend screening based on age and smoking history, may be insufficient for individuals in underrepresented communities.

The UIC researchers, who are members of the University of Illinois Cancer Center, found that when compared with patients in the NLST, the cohort of patients engaged in a Chicago-based lung cancer screening program had a higher percentage of black (69.6 percent vs. 4.5 percent) and Latino (10.6 percent vs. 1.8 percent) individuals, double the number of positive scans (24.6 percent vs. 13.7 percent) and a higher percentage of diagnosed lung cancer cases (2.6 percent vs. 1.1 percent).

Their findings are published in JAMA Oncology.

The researchers say the data illustrates how the national trial is not representative of all people living in the U.S., particularly of minorities.

Senior author Dr. Lawrence Feldman says that comparing the national screening data to baseline screening data from a diverse and urban population, including patients who receive care at federally

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