Making individualized choices about breast cancer screening
Share

WHO: Nancy L Keating, MD, MPH, primary care physician, Division of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; professor, Harvard Medical School

Lydia E. Pace, MD, MPH, primary care physician, Division of Women’s Health and General Internal Medicine; Director of the Women’s Health Policy and Advocacy Program, Connors Center for Women’s Health, BWH; assistant professor, HMS

WHAT: In a JAMA Insights article, published on May 1 by JAMA, co-authors Keating and Pace summarize the current state of breast cancer screening. The authors note, that despite the fact that the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) changed its recommendation in 2009 to mammograms every two years for women aged 50-74 instead of annual mammograms beginning at age 40, there has been little change in U.S. screening practices. They further point out that the USPSTF reiterated its recommendation in 2016 and that the American Cancer Society joined the task force in 2015 in advocating less routine use of mammography and a more individualized approach to screening.

In the Insights article, Keating and Pace highlight potential reasons for the limited change in mammography practices, such as clinicians emphasizing the benefits of screening without discussing the possible harms. “However, the most important

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD