Microscopic oxygen bubbles could help improve cancer therapeutics, speed wound healing
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WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – A Purdue University-patented technology shows promise in using microscopic bubbles filled with oxygen to help with various medical treatments, including improving cancer therapeutics and helping wounds heal faster.

Samara Biotech LLC, a Purdue startup, has developed an easy-to-use method to inject oxygen “nanobubbles” intravenously so they can be targeted precisely at wounds or cancerous tumors. The bubbles do not actually do the therapies, but enhance other therapies, such as improving chemotherapeutics or radiation efficacy, said Pushpak Bhandari, Samara Biotech founder.

“It’s an oxygen delivery system at its core that can be applied toward many diseased states,” Bhandari said “Oxygen is critical in almost every biological process, so this helps in a variety of ways.”

Studies have shown that a lack of oxygen in tumor cells changes how cells function, contributing to cancer growth. Low oxygen, or hypoxia, is a major challenge in treating some cancers because it is common in a majority of malignant tumors. Tumor cells are starved of oxygen, causing them to become resistant to conventional treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy. This can lead to a need to increase radiation doses or chemotherapy concentration, which often adversely affects patients.

The nanobubble shells

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