Molecular culprit behind virus-mediated chronic inflammation and cancers identified
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IMAGE: BC-3 cells were stained with DAPI, anti-vFLIP, anti-CADM1, and cholera toxin B conjugated with red fluorescence to detect GM-1 and subjected to confocal microscopy. view more 

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Credit: Hunte R et al. (2018)

Within cells infected by Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), the human protein CADM1 interacts with viral proteins to promote chronic inflammation, which plays a major role in the development of cancers caused by KSHV. Richard Hunte of the University of Miami, Florida, and colleagues present these new findings in PLOS Pathogens.

About 12 percent of all cancers are linked to viruses such as KSHV, which causes Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and the lymphoma-like multicentric Castleman’s disease. These cancers are associated with chronic inflammation caused by abnormal activation of the human protein NF-κB in KSHV-infected cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of NF-κB activation are poorly understood.

Hunte and colleagues had previously found that the human protein CADM1 might play a key role in NF-κB activation caused by a different cancer-associated virus known as HTLV-1. In the new study, they investigated whether CADM1 plays a similar role in KSHV-infected cells.

The research team infected primary human cells with KSHV and found that CADM1 levels in the cells increased significantly within

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