More frequent screening after prostate cancer treatment not linked to improved survival
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CHICAGO — Prostate cancer patients who were monitored more frequently after treatment did not live significantly longer than patients who were monitored once a year, according to study findings led by a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher.

At the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, researchers presented findings on Friday, June 1, from an analysis of data from nearly 10,500 prostate cancer patients in the United States from 2005 to 2010. The study’s primary goal was to determine if more frequent monitoring with the prostate-specific antigen test after treatment improved patients’ long-term survival. The researchers found that survival risk was not significantly different for patients who had PSA monitoring every three months compared with patients who had monitoring once a year.

“This suggests that for prostate cancer patients, once-a-year monitoring may be enough,” said UNC Lineberger’s Ronald C. Chen, MD, MPH, associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology, who was the study’s first author. “This is not a surprising finding because prostate cancer is often a slow-growing disease.”

After completing treatment for prostate cancer, patients need routine monitoring to detect a potential recurrence of the cancer

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