NCI study revises molecular classification for most common type of lymphoma
Share

In a new study, researchers identified genetic subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that could help explain why some patients with the disease respond to treatment and others don’t. The study, led by researchers in the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, with additional authors from several institutions around the world, was published online April 11, 2018, in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“These findings are the culmination of two decades of research at NCI and elsewhere, advancing our understanding of the effect of DNA mutations and gene expression on lymphoma biology and outcome,” said NCI Director Ned Sharpless, M.D. “This refined molecular classification will be instrumental in predicting prognosis and tailoring therapy for patients with DLBCL going forward.”

DLBCL is the most common type of lymphoma. Although it can be aggressive, it is potentially curable, and in some patients, treatment eliminates the disease. However, researchers still don’t have a full understanding of why some lymphomas of this type respond to treatment and others don’t. The standard treatment for the disease is a combination of chemotherapy drugs plus rituximab, a drug known as a monoclonal

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD