New genetic compound marker could help early diagnosis of aggressive prostate cancer
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A research team at the University of Turku in Finland discovered a link between the interplay of certain simultaneously occurring genetic changes in the HOXB13 and CIP2A genes, aggressiveness of prostate cancer, high risk of developing the disease, and poorer survival rates of patients. Prostate cancer is a major challenge in health care with over one million new cases and 300,000 deaths from it each year worldwide.

One of the involved genes, HOXB13, was already known to play a role in prostate cancer risk, although its mechanism is not yet understood. The other gene, CIP2A, codes for an oncoprotein, thought to play a role in human tumour formation.

– The research shows that synergism between the HOXB13 and CIP2A genes predispose men to get prostate cancer earlier in life. The synergism is also linked to the high level of prostate specific antigen (PSA), and earlier biochemical recurrence. Further, the simultaneous expression of these two gene variants stimulates prostate cancer cell growth, migration and, therefore, tumour formation, explains Professor Johanna Schleutker, leader of the research group at the Institute of Biomedicine.

Testing Different Variants Could Help Finding At-Risk Patients

One of the most notable current unmet needs in prostate cancer

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