Eureka Alert
Share

CINCINNATI–Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have discovered a target in several types of leukemia that could be treated with an existing Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug for other types of blood cancers.

These findings, published in the July 5, 2018, advance online edition of Leukemia, provide important results that could offer another treatment option for patients and make it easier for investigators to move more quickly into a clinical trial, since the drug is already approved.

“Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) controls the production of certain types of white blood cells, known as neutrophils,” says Ken Greis, PhD, professor in the Department of Cancer Biology, member of the Cincinnati Cancer Center and UC Cancer Institute and one of the corresponding authors on the paper. “Mutations in G-CSFR have a harmful effect on the production of neutrophils and are reported in patients with several blood disorders including severe congenital neutropenia (SCN), chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Unfortunately, despite years of research, the malignant signaling of the mutated G-CSFRs is not well understood.”

For this study, researchers used an advanced mass spectrometry-based technology adapted in

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD