Novel cancer vaccine strategy blocks death of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells
Share

IMAGE: This is a photograph of Drs. Esteban Celis and Hussein Sultan in the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University laboratory. view more 

Credit: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University

AUGUSTA, Ga. (May 1, 2018) – New research published in Cancer Immunology Research by Drs. Esteban Celis and Hussein Sultan of the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University could serve as the stepping-stone in constructing vaccines with a greater likelihood of finding and attacking tumors in the human body.

According to Celis and Sultan, the key in this vaccine strategy is increasing the amount of time a cytokine called interleukin 2 (IL2) stays in the body. IL2 is a molecule in the immune system responsible for regulating the activity of some white blood cells known as killer T cells.

“After administering peptide-based vaccines in mouse models of cancer, we saw that sustained IL2 signaling dramatically increased the number of tumor-specific cancer-killing T cells (CD8+),” said Dr. Hussein Sultan, a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Celis, leader of the Center’s Cancer Immunology, Inflammation and Tolerance Program.

During their experiments, Celis and Sultan noticed there was also an increase in the T cells’ ability to resist cancer immune evasion caused

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD