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24 April 2018 – Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that comprises 1% of all new cancer cases and almost 2% of cancer deaths in the U.S. The five-year survival rate for the disease is less than 20%.

Researchers at the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have identified a novel molecular pathway by which a circadian clock gene, SHARP1, causes the growth of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The finding paves the way for the development of new therapeutic strategies that could impede the development of this cancer of the blood and bone marrow.

The six-year long study was led by CSI director Professor Daniel Tenen, Associate Professor Reshma Taneja at the Department of Physiology, Dr. Akihiko Numata, Adjunct Research Scientist at CSI Singapore, Kwok Hui Si (a PhD student from CSI), as well as scientists from the University of Oxford, UK; the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute; the University of Alabama at Birmingham; the Medical Erasmus University Medical Center in The Netherlands; as well as the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. It was published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications in April 2018.

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