Old Tissues Have Many Mutations, Even Absent Cancer
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Cancer is the result of random mutational damage to nuclear DNA, but most such damage has no real effect, not even to the behavior of the affected cell. Cells in old tissues are riddled with mutations, but it is an open question as to how much this accumulated damage contributes to aging beyond cancer risk. Does it produce sufficient disarray in tissue function to be measured? A mutation capable of meaningfully altering cell behavior (a small subset of all possible mutations) can only have a noticeable affect when it occurs in many cells, a significant fraction of those present in a tissue. One slightly defective cell is a drop in the ocean, provided it isn’t actively cancerous.

mutational damagenuclear DNA

Many researchers consider that the outcome of clonal expansion of mutations in adult tissue can be achieved when the original mutation occurs in a stem cell of some kind. The mutation can spread with the long-term delivery of a supply of daughter somatic cells and their descendants. Along these lines, the studies noted in the article below raise the possibility that cancer-associated mutations can also grant this ability to spread through excessive replication, yet without immediately resulting in the production of a

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