Older Mice Heal Skin Injuries More Slowly, but with Less Scarring
Share

28

Sep

2018

28

Sep

2018

Older Mice Heal Skin Injuries More Slowly, but with Less Scarring

Loading…

Loading…

Researchers have recently provided evidence for regeneration of skin injuries in old mice to result in lesser degrees of scarring than is the case in young mice. The usual consideration of regeneration with age is that it is disrupted by rising levels of inflammation. Further, the same set of inflammatory mechanisms appear to cause the formation of inappropriate scar-like tissue in organs, the process of fibrosis that contributes to loss of function and organ failure. Finding a way to align those well established results with the data from this study should keep research groups busy for some years. Nothing is simple in mammalian biochemistry.

Organisms repair wounds using a combination of two biological processes: scar formation and tissue regeneration. Scar formation results in deposition of fibrous tissue that disrupts the original tissue architecture. Tissue regeneration results in reconstitution of the original and functional tissue architecture, including all cellular subtypes and absence of scar formation. Although amphibians regenerate lost limbs, mammals generally repair injured tissue with scar formation. However, limited examples of human tissue regeneration do exist, including adult liver regeneration, pediatric

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.fightaging.org

Click here for the full story


© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD