PARP inhibitor improves progression-free survival in patients with advanced breast cancers
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IMAGE: Jennifer Litton, M.D. view more 

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Credit: MD Anderson Cancer Center

In a randomized, Phase III trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the PARP inhibitor talazoparib extended progression-free survival (PFS) and improved quality-of-life measures over available chemotherapies for patients with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes.

The results of the EMBRACA trial were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The findings were first presented at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium by Jennifer Litton, M.D., associate professor of Breast Medical Oncology, also corresponding author of the study.

“The trial found that talazoparib provides a significant clinical benefit to all patient subgroups, including those with hormone receptor-positive and triple-negative disease,” said Litton. “The results of this trial are quite exciting and indicate talazoparib is a novel treatment option for patients with metastatic breast cancer and BRCA mutations.”

Mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes, which account for 5 to 10 percent of all breast cancers, cause defects in normal DNA damage repair. PARP inhibitors block an additional DNA repair pathway, and the anti-tumor effects of PARP inhibitors can be intensified in patients with BRCA mutations. Talazoparib works by not only inhibiting the PARP

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