Patient-partnered genomics study IDs immunotherapy as potential treatment for rare cancer
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NEW YORK — Angiosarcoma Project, a patient-partnered genomics study, identified immune checkpoint inhibition as a potential treatment option for patients with angiosarcomas of the head, face, neck, or scalp (HFNS), according to data presented at the fourth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival, held Sept. 30-Oct. 3.

“Angiosarcoma is an exceedingly rare cancer affecting about 300 patients a year in the United States, has a high mortality rate, and has no standard of care; because of its rarity, there is a dearth of scientific discoveries that can lead to clinical impact,” said Corrie A. Painter, PhD, associate director of Operations and Scientific Outreach at Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. “It is important to develop novel approaches for working with patients who are geographically dispersed and who may never have the opportunity to participate in a large-scale research effort because they have such a rare disease.”

The Angiosarcoma Project, launched by the Broad Institute in March 2017 in collaboration with Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, partners with patients throughout the duration of the project, including design, build, launch, and accrual, to develop a comprehensive resource to enable discoveries about this rare cancer, Painter said. Researchers in this project

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