Eureka Alert
Share

Adults living with lymphoblastic leukaemia in deprived areas of England have 15-20 per cent higher risk of dying. Study also found patients treated at hospitals which manage small number of leukaemia cases also have significantly lower survival rate. Findings could have implications for how NHS treat leukaemia patients, with an argument for specialist centres.

Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia living in deprived areas of England have poorer survival rates, a new study has found.

The research, conducted by experts from the University of Sheffield, also found adult patients treated at hospitals which manage small numbers of leukaemia cases also have a significantly lower survival rate.

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is a type of blood cancer that starts from young white blood cells called lymphocytes in the bone marrow – the soft inner part of the bones where new blood cells are made. The condition is rare, especially in adults.

The findings, published in the journal BMC Cancer, show adult patients with the condition living in more socioeconomically deprived areas had around 15-20 per cent higher mortality than patients living in the least deprived areas.

Meanwhile, patients treated at hospitals which manage small numbers of patients with this rare condition had

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD