Eureka Alert
Share

In 2013, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to three scientists for their contributions to uncovering the mechanisms governing vesicle transport in cells. Their explanations provided both a conceptual and a mechanistic understanding of basic processes at the most fundamental level.

At the heart of this Nobel Prize-winning intracellular process lies SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors), a superfamily of 60 proteins in mammalian cells that transport lipids and membrane proteins across the cells by facilitating the fusion of vesicles to their target membranes.

Biologists at UC Santa Barbara have now discovered a surprising, additional function for syntaxin 3S, a soluble form of a SNARE protein. The researchers found a new signaling pathway widely used by human and other mammalian cells. The team’s results appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

“What we found was very unorthodox and hadn’t been known before,” explained corresponding author Thomas Weimbs, a professor in UCSB’s Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. “Syntaxin 3S binds to transcription factors — proteins involved in converting DNA into RNA — and regulates the expression of the genes controlled by those factors. In fact, our initial results suggest that these genes play a

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD