Researcher blocks protein that defeats powerful tumor suppressor in breast cancer
Share

IMAGE: Awasthi’s discovery is a game changer in cancer treatment because more than half of all types of cancers lack normal p53. view more 

Credit: TTUHSC

Over half of all breast cancers carry genetic defects in the p53 gene, a powerful tumor suppressor. Loss of this gene increases the risk of getting breast cancer and the resultant cancers become highly resistant to treatment.

Sanjay Awasthi, M.D., a professor in the TTUHSC Department of Internal Medicine and an oncologist, received a Department of Defense $1,147,500 grant for his research, “Prevention of Breast Cancer by Haploinsufficiency of RALBP1.”

“Despite decades of research, there had been no satisfactory way to overcome the deleterious effects of p53 loss – until now,” Awasthi said. “We showed for the first time that blocking the stress-responsive protein called Rlip (Rlip76 or RALBP1) defeats the deleterious effects of p53 loss more effectively. This discovery is a game changer in cancer treatment because more than half of all types of cancers lack normal p53.”

Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) is a hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome reported in 1969 by Drs. Frederick Li and Joseph Fraumeni. Approximately 1 out of every 10,000 people have the syndrome and can be afflicted with

read more...


Article originally posted at
www.eurekalert.org

Click here for the full story


CategoryAggregator News

© 2017 - LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION
Privacy Policy / Terms Of Use

Powered by MMD