Researchers find prostate cancer drug byproduct can fuel cancer cells
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VIDEO: New Cleveland Clinic study published in JCI finds that prostate cancer drug byproduct can fuel cancer cells. view more 

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June 25, 2018, Cleveland: A genetic anomaly in certain men with prostate cancer may impact their response to common drugs used to treat the disease, according to new research at Cleveland Clinic. The findings may provide important information for identifying which patients potentially fare better when treated with an alternate therapy.

In a newly published study in Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers found that abiraterone, a common prostate cancer drug, yields high-levels of a testosterone-like byproduct in men with advanced disease who have a specific genetic variant.

The study’s lead researcher, Nima Sharifi, M.D., Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute Department of Cancer Biology, previously discovered that men with aggressive prostate cancer who have a specific variant in the HSD3B1 gene have poorer outcomes than patients without the variant. HSD3B1 encodes an enzyme that allows cancer cells to use adrenal androgens for fuel. This enzyme is overactive in patients with the variant HSD3B1(1245C).

In the new study, Dr. Sharifi and his team, including first author Mohammad Alyamani, Ph.D., found that men with the genetic anomaly metabolize abiraterone differently than men without

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