Researchers identify compound to prevent breast cancer cells from activating in brain
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IMAGE: Images show tumor cells in a mouse brain at different days. Tumor cells are indicated as green dash lines. The blood vessels become leaky after day 6. In the upper… view more 

Credit: Houston Methodist

Researchers at Houston Methodist used computer modeling to find an existing investigational drug compound for leukemia patients to treat triple negative breast cancer once it spreads to the brain.

The Houston Methodist researchers culled through thousands of existing drugs to see if they could identify a compound that would prevent cancer cells from spreading, or metastasizing. They discovered edelfosine, which has been FDA-approved as an investigational leukemia treatment, and has also been used in clinical research for primary brain tumors.

In the March 22 online issue of Cancer Research, scientists explained how they injected triple negative breast cancer stem cells from patients into mice. After treating them with this compound, the cancer stem cells did not grow once they metastasized to the brain.

“This compound stopped the cancer cells from communicating with brain cells as they traveled from the breast to the brain. Repurposing a drug compound to prevent the spread of cancer could be a game-changer in the prevention and treatment of

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Article originally posted at
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