Scientist earns third concurrent National Cancer Institute grant to study breast cancer
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IMAGE: Deb Kelly, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was awarded $2.1 million by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to study the protein that gives rise to… view more 

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Credit: Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute

Deb Kelly, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was awarded $2.1 million by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to study the protein that gives rise to a hard-to-treat form of breast cancer. This is her third concurrent R01 grant, which funds a specific line of research for five years, from the NCI of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

“The awarding of three concurrent R01 research grants, through the rigorous NIH peer-review process, from the National Cancer Institute to an individual early to mid-career scientist who is working on different aspects of a common problem is highly unusual,” said Michael Friedlander, executive director of the VTCRI and Virginia Tech’s vice president for health sciences and technology. “It is indicative of the high regard that Debbie’s colleagues have for her and her work.”

Kelly’s work hinges on seeing what is technologically possible, and then moving beyond those limitations.

“To solve a problem, we need to see it,” Kelly said in what has become

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