Scientists create technology that measures tumors' drug resistance up to 10 times faster
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IMAGE: This is an HLSCI image of live melanoma cells colored to indicate the distribution of mass within each cell. view more 

Credit: VCU Massey Cancer Center

A group of scientists from VCU Massey Cancer Center and UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a new, high-speed microscopy platform that can measure a cancer cell’s resistance to drugs up to 10 times faster than existing technology, potentially informing more effective treatment selection for cancer patients. The technology is being presented in abstract form today at the American Association for Cancer Research’s Annual Meeting in Chicago.

Fast and repeated assessments of tumor sensitivity to available drugs can improve clinical outcomes by staying ahead of a cancer’s ability to resist certain therapies.

Quantitative phase imaging has proven to be effective in measuring individual cell growth in response to various therapies, especially in cancers that grow in clusters such as melanoma. However, in current implementations, this technique is constrained by limited sample size.

The group of scientists led by Jason Reed, Ph.D., member of the Cancer Molecular Genetics research program at VCU Massey Cancer Center, created a novel multi-sample, multidrug testing platform called High-Speed Live-Cell Interferometry (HSLCI) that directly measures tumor response

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