Scientists develop novel drug that could potentially treat liver cancer more effectively
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IMAGE: Professor Daniel Tenen (right) and Dr Liu Bee Hui (left), who are researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore, are members of the… view more 

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A research team led by scientists from the Cancer Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a novel peptide drug called FFW that could potentially stop the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or primary liver cancer. This landmark discovery opens door for more effective treatment of liver cancer with less side effects.

The international team comprises researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital at Harvard Medical School, the Department of Biological Sciences under the NUS Faculty of Science, as well as the Agency for Science, Technology and Research.

HCC is a fast-growing cancer of the liver, and patients typically survive 11 months after diagnosis. HCC accounts for over 90 per cent of all liver cancers and poses a major public health problem in the Asia Pacific region. The main first-line treatment for HCC is the drug Sorafenib, which has adverse side effects and prolongs survival for only three months. The lack of effective treatment alternatives, coupled with late discovery, has led

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