Scientists identify 170 potential lung cancer drug targets using unique cellular library
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IMAGE: From left, Dr. Bruce Posner, Dr. Michael Roth, Dr. Michael Peyton, and Dr. John Minna were part of the team scientists who identified 170 chemicals for potential new targets to… view more 

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Credit: UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – April 19, 2018 – After testing more than 200,000 chemical compounds, UT Southwestern’s Simmons Cancer Center researchers have identified 170 chemicals that are potential candidates for development into drug therapies for lung cancer.

The 5-year project set out to identify new therapeutic targets for non-small cell lung cancer as well as potential drugs for these targets – a significant step forward toward personalizing cancer care.

“For the large majority of compounds, we identified a predictive biomarker – a feature that allows the development of ‘precision medicine,’ or individualized treatment for each patient, which is a major goal of the Simmons Cancer Center,” said Dr. John Minna, Director of the Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. for both men and women, according to the National Cancer Institute. Non-small cell lung cancer, the type of cancer studied in this research, comprises approximately 85 percent of all lung cancers. In

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