Shooting the Achilles heel of drug-resistant cancer
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Cancer cells that develop resistance to drugs, pay a price for this, by simultaneously developing a new vulnerability. If this acquired vulnerability can be identified, it may be exploited clinically. A team of cancer researchers, led by Rene Bernards of the Netherlands Cancer Institute and Oncode Institute, now exposed this acquired vulnerability in melanoma that has developed resistance to a targeted therapy with BRAF-inhibitors. The team then developed a new therapeutic strategy to selectively kill the drug-resistant cancer cells.

Do not fight resistance, but exploit it

One of the greatest obstacles in treating cancer is the rapid emergence of therapy resistance. However, when cancer cells develop drug resistance, they also acquire a new vulnerability, which is, in Darwinian terms, the fitness cost that comes with adapting to a new regime. If this newly acquired vulnerability can be exposed, it may be exploited clinically to keep the cancer at bay for a longer period, according to cancer researcher Rene Bernards.

Professor Bernards: ‘Drug resistance seems inevitable because tumours are constantly adapting. For over 40 years, we have been devising ways to prevent drug resistance in cancer. Now I think: let’s just accept that this is the way it is, and go and see if

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Article originally posted at
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