Small Molecules Convert Supporting Cells in Damaged Brain Tissue into New Neurons
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Researchers here present an interesting approach to regeneration of the brain. Rather than spur greater creation of new neurons, or delivering neurons via cell therapy, they find a way to persuade supporting cells near damaged areas to convert themselves into neurons. They have not yet demonstrated that this will work in animals to restore lost function. In situ cell reprogramming is a part of the field that has a lot of promise, but much of the experimentation has yet to be accomplished. “Reprogramming” covers a wide range of possible goals, from minor changes to encourage cells into greater activity or altered behavior within their type, to the more radical adjustments such as change of type or inducement of pluripotency. It remains to be seen which of these approaches will turn out to be viable in the near term of the next decade or so.

neuronscell therapycell reprogramming

A simple drug cocktail that converts cells neighboring damaged neurons into functional new neurons could potentially be used to treat stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, and brain injuries. A team of researchers identified a set of four, or even three, molecules that could convert glial cells – which normally provide support and insulation for neurons –

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